Your Tuesday Briefing – The New York Times

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A few candidates have dropped out recently — most notably Pete Buttigieg, who won the first contest of this primary, in Iowa, just a month ago. How has that changed things going into Tuesday’s vote?

The short answer: We don’t really know! Early voting has been going on for weeks in some of these states, so any votes already cast for Pete Buttigieg won’t count. For those who haven’t voted yet, polling doesn’t give us much of an indication that their support might go overwhelmingly to one candidate. When asked about their second choice, Mr. Buttigieg’s backers were fairly split among Mr. Biden, Mike Bloomberg and Elizabeth Warren, with slightly more going to Mr. Sanders.

Are there any states you’ll be watching in particular? California is the big one, and polls have put that firmly in Sanders territory.

I’ll be watching California for sure. If Ms. Warren is going to remain competitive, that’s where it could happen for her. Also, Texas has a huge delegate haul, so that’s really important, too. Mr. Sanders has shown strength with Latino voters, so he could do well there.

Where will you be reporting from? Hopefully somewhere with good food?

Sadly, I’m going to be eating election-night pizza at The New York Times’s world headquarters in Manhattan. But we’re dispatching reporters all over the country. It really is a huge effort to get reporting from so many contests at once.

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That’s it for this briefing. See you next time.

— Mike


Thank you
To Mark Josephson and Eleanor Stanford for the break from the news. You can reach the team at briefing@nytimes.com.

P.S.
• We’re listening to “The Daily.” Our latest episode is about Joe Biden’s victory in the South Carolina primary.
• Here’s today’s Mini Crossword puzzle, and a clue: Tailpipe emissions (five letters). You can find all our puzzles here.
• Times journalists go to great lengths to maintain impartiality inside and outside of the newsroom. Here are some of the ways they do so on dates, in their friend circles and in voting booths.

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